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The Cheetah Enclosure – 7

Choose a resident cheetah to sponsor

Please become a conservation partner and assist us by covering part or all of the annual costs for caring for these non-releasable cheetahs. Each cheetah costs CCF an estimated £2,500 a year in care. These costs include food, veterinary care and pen maintenance.

If you sponsor the cost of the care of a CCF non-releasable cheetah you will receive two updates during a year (please provide an e-mail address for updates if other than yours). You can also create your own personalised Sponsorship Certificate to print out, and download a special photo poster of your cheetah, taken from the official cheetah ID book in Namibia. Each JPEG poster file is up to 1MB in size and up to 250mm across, and shows pictures of the cheetah, highlighting distinguishing markings for identification. IMPORTANT: If you want the sponsorship to be a gift, be sure to note this using the Message to Seller facility on the main PayPal payment screen.

To create a Sponsorship Certificate or download a poster, be sure to click ‘Return to Merchant’ after you have completed your PayPal transaction, or you will not see our ‘Thank You’ page, which contains the information required.

If you sponsor a cheetah for a whole year (£2,500) you will receive special recognition at our headquarters in Namibia.

Sponsoring is simple! Just click the 'Sponsor Me' button under any cheetah's story. You will be taken to a PayPal secure payment page, where you can choose how much you want to sponsor your cheetah for. Once you've sponsored one cheetah, you can come back and sponsor another one if you wish. Here are five of our resident cheetahs. See the other pages for more.

Minja

"My sisters Jacomina, Emma and I are named after the daughters of the farmer who caught us. We were caught on a game farm near Hochfeld when we were about one year old. We were so scared when we first arrived at CCF in March 2007. We were kept in a quarantine area until CCF received our lab results. In the quarantine area, we slowly became used to staff checking on us and bringing us food."

The farm manager saw an adult cheetah with what appeared to be a broken leg so he shot her to put her out of her misery. The owner of the farm insists on having traps for cheetahs out since this farm has valuable game and the three cubs were caught then. They were most probably the cubs of the female that was shot because otherwise the mother would have come to the cubs in the cage. An interesting fact about the shot female is that: based on the ear tag that the farmer gave CCF, she was a cheetah that came into us in August of 2005 with three cubs, about 6 months old from the same area, near Hochfeld. We released them on the big field, and she made it back to her home area. She lost those three cubs somehow and then mothered these other three.

They live in CCF's 64-hectare Bellebeno enclosure and are often referred to as ‘The Wild Girls’ due to their wild behaviour. It has taken their keepers a long time to train them to come to the feeding bakkie when called and run alongside the other Bellebenno females. However, the three still act very differently from the others and will pace and growl furiously around the feeding car when stationary. Also when chucked their meat all three make a huge amount of noise and commotion when grabbing it before sprinting away into the bush. Because of this ‘wild’ behaviour they are potential release cats for CCF's re-wilding and re-introduction research project. Minja has the most slender face of the three and is the easiest to identify. She also has a distinctive tail with thick black stripes near the end with a white tip.

Jacomina

"My sisters Emma, Minja and I are named after the daughters of the farmer who caught us. We were caught on a game farm near Hochfeld when we were about one year old. We were so scared when we first arrived at CCF in March 2007. We were kept in a quarantine area until CCF received our lab results. In the quarantine area, we slowly became used to staff checking on us and bringing us food."

The farm manager saw an adult cheetah with what appeared to be a broken leg so he shot her to put her out of her misery. The owner of the farm insists on having traps for cheetahs out since this farm has valuable game and the three cubs were caught then. They were most probably the cubs of the female that was shot because otherwise the mother would have come to the cubs in the cage. An interesting fact about the shot female is that: based on the ear tag that the farmer gave CCF, she was a cheetah that came into us in August of 2005 with three cubs, about 6 months old from the same area, near Hochfeld. We released them on the big field, and she made it back to her home area. She lost those three cubs somehow and then mothered these other three.

Jacomina looks similar to her sister Emma minus the fluffy tail and ‘worried’ expression, and is slightly darker along her back. They live in CCF's 64-hectare Bellebeno enclosure and are often referred to as ‘The Wild Girls’ due to their wild behaviour. It has taken their keepers a long time to train them to come to the feeding bakkie when called and run alongside the other Bellebenno females. However, the three still act very differently from the others and will pace and growl furiously around the feeding car when stationary. Also when chucked their meat all three make a huge amount of noise and commotion when grabbing it before sprinting away into the bush. Because of this ‘wild’ behaviour they are potential release cats for CCF's re-wilding and re-introduction research project.

Polly

"CCF had been following our mom via satellite radio collar for the past year; and in July 2009 a farmer called to say she was found dead. The CCF staff knew though that she had cubs, so, working with the farmer, they set catch cages and caught me with my three siblings after about a week. We were ~3 months' old. We now live at CCF and are enjoying the attention."

Polly is the only female of the four cubs, and is named after Polly Hix – a donor of CCF. She is a playful little girl and never misses an opportunity to pounce on and wrestle her brothers until they respond and play with her. As a lady of luxury, once she’s found a comfortable place to rest she is reluctant to leave and is usually the last of the siblings to move away from their sleeping area.

Emma

"My sisters Jacomina, Minja and I are named after the daughters of the farmer who caught us. We were caught on a game farm near Hochfeld when we were about one year old. We were so scared when we first arrived at CCF in March 2007. We were kept in a quarantine area until CCF received our lab results. In the quarantine area, we slowly became used to staff checking on us and bringing us food."

The farm manager saw an adult cheetah with what appeared to be a broken leg so he shot her to put her out of her misery. The owner of the farm insists on having traps for cheetahs out since this farm has valuable game and the three cubs were caught then. They were most probably the cubs of the female that was shot because otherwise the mother would have come to the cubs in the cage. An interesting fact about the shot female is that: based on the ear tag that the farmer gave CCF, she was a cheetah that came into us in August of 2005 with three cubs, about 6 months old from the same area, near Hochfeld. We released them on the big field, and she made it back to her home area. She lost those three cubs somehow and then mothered these other three.

Emma and her sisters live in CCF's 64-hectare Bellebeno enclosure and are often referred to as ‘The Wild Girls’ due to their wild behaviour. It has taken their keepers a long time to train them to come to the feeding bakkie when called and run alongside the other Bellebenno females. However, the three still act very differently from the others and will pace and growl furiously around the feeding car when stationary. Also when chucked their meat all three make a huge amount of noise and commotion when grabbing it before sprinting away into the bush. Because of this ‘wild’ behaviour they are potential release cats for CCF's re-wilding and re-introduction research project.

N'Dunge

"My brother Shunga and I were only two months' old and orphaned when a farmer discovered us on his land. It was June 2008; we were wandering near the sheep and goat corral, and were considered threats to the livestock. Therefore, CCF was called to pick us up and where we were hand raised by CCF staff."
N’Dunge (or Smart Man) was named so by a volunteer that helped raise him because of his intelligent demeanor. He and his brother Shunga are virtually inseparable, and very difficult to tell apart. N’Dunga and his brother spend their time lounging around in the sun, and putting on a show for CCF visitors. When running, N’Dunga chases the lure with a wild desire in his eyes. He is considered one of “Bruce’s Boys,” and receives attention from Bruce every day along with his pen-mates Ron, Little C, and his brother Shunga.

N’Dunge has a small build and a perfect cheetah face, with tear-marks that run precisely to the corners of his mouth. He is a beautiful cat, and a wonderful runner, and will continue to win the hearts of all the visitors that lay eyes upon him.

Shunga

"I was found in June 2008 with my brother N’Dunge at two months of age. A farmer in the Gobabis area found us wandering near the sheep and goat corral, and considered us a threat to his livestock. We were found without a mother, and were therefore caught and brought back to CCF where we were hand-raised by CCF staff."

Shunga (or Blonde Man) was named so by a volunteer because of his light-colored coat, and other than that one, slight difference, he and his brother N’Dunga are virtually impossible to tell apart. Almost like identical twins, the two stick together through thick and thin. Shunga is a very laid-back cat, usually sleeping through the day near his brother. As a runner, Shunga has a beautiful stride and always acts as if chasing the lure were the best game ever invented. Shunga lives with his pen-mates Little C, Ron, and his brother N’Dunga.

He is a beautiful cat, and a wonderful runner, and will continue to win the hearts of all the visitors that lay eyes upon him.

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The Cheetah Conservation Fund UK is a UK registered charity, number 1079874

Make Cheques payable to: Cheetah Conservation Fund UK, 27 Peel Street, Kensington, London W8 7PA


email: uk@cheetah.org